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From left to right: Bee Orchid Orchis apifera. Greater Butterfly Orchid Planthera chlorantha. Broad Bodied Chaser. 
Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuschii.

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The way this page works is that the most recently added images are usually right at the bottom. At this time all the images shown replace those previously on this page.

I have been travelling for a while and now thought I ought to put up a few images to finish the year. Some are old some not so old. I apologise for the lack of originality but I'm not quite back in to a new life without my wife.

Meanwhile thank you for looking at my site and I apologise that it has been somewhat unchaging in 2018. I hope 2019 will be a better year.

In February I lived with a friend in Murcia Province. Lovely light, landscapes and wildlife to photograph. The highlight however was the parade in Aguilas. Plenty feathers but all in the gorgeous costumes of the beautiful people.

 

Below I have provided a little text as background to the Western Australian images.

 

 

Almond tree
Almond tree
A very distorted tree attracted attention.
Almond Blossom
Almond Blossom
The roofs in Moratalla
The roofs in Moratalla
An alleyway
An alleyway
Flamingo
Flamingo
Little Owl
Little Owl
Jay
Jay
Jay
Jay
Singing Honeyeater
Singing Honeyeater
Another common garden bird
Red Wattle Bird
Red Wattle Bird
The largest of the local honeyeaters this is an aggressive defender of its territory and will even attack people and their dogs in season.
Australian Magpie
Australian Magpie
This is a well know species, during the spring, attacking anything it chooses. So much so that notices are placed in public spaces warning people that they must beware it is "Magpie season" It has been known to blind people as result of pecking them in the eye!!
Corrella
Corrella
A common species in towns where it may roost in hundreds.
Galah
Galah
There very colourful birds are common in towns.
Laughing Lookaburra
Laughing Lookaburra
One of two species of Kookaburra in Australia but not native to Western Australia to where it was introduced from the eastin the early days of colonisation.
Sooty or Black Oystercatcher
Sooty or Black Oystercatcher
A wading species to be found around estuaries and coasts.
Silver Gulls
Silver Gulls
The most common gull to be seen in the SW.
Pacific Gull
Pacific Gull
Arguably the biggest gull in the world and not uncommon around the coast.
Straw Necked Ibis
Straw Necked Ibis
Not uncommon around Perth city's lakes.
Black necked stilt
Black necked stilt
A moulting individual
Glossby Ibis
Glossby Ibis
Not uncommon in spring around some lakes.
Purple Swamp Hen
Purple Swamp Hen
Very common by Lake Herdsman in Perth
Black Swan
Black Swan
After which the Swan River is named.



Rufous Whsitler
Rufous Whsitler
A small bush bird with a pleasant whistling song.
White Faced Heron
White Faced Heron
A dainty inhabitant of shore and lakeside.
Grey Fantail
Grey Fantail
These little birds often appear to seek you out when you enter their territory.They are well named from their habit of fanning out their tail feathers.
Laughing Dove
Laughing Dove
These little doves are not uncommon.
Grey Currawong
Grey Currawong
Member of the crow family.
Thornbill species
Thornbill species
I am guessing when I say it is probably the Western Thornbill. These tiny birds seem equivalent to northern hemisphere phylloscopus warblers (Acanthiza is the genus)
Yellow Plumed Honeyeater
Yellow Plumed Honeyeater
A bird I associate with Wandoo woodland.
Willie Wagtail
Willie Wagtail
Equivalent to out northern bird they actually wag their tails rather than bobbing them.
Wood Swallow
Wood Swallow
Rufous Tree Creeper
Rufous Tree Creeper
The Coalseam River gorge
The Coalseam River gorge
A find of coal in the early days was never extracted because of the low quality of the coal.

See if you can spot the two Western Grey Kangaroos.
Everlastings
Everlastings
In places like Coalseam the ground is carpetted in various small flowers in Spring if winter rains have been good.
Firewood Banksia
Firewood Banksia
This large group of plants takes its common name from Sir Joseph Banks naturalist on Capt. Cook's first voyage to the eastern seaboard and New Zealand.
Banksia species
Banksia species
This was flowering in early September on the south coast near Bremer Bay.
Royal Hakea
Royal Hakea
This striking plant was growing in the Fitzgerald River National Park right down on the south coast.
Qualuup Bells
Qualuup Bells
This plant grows in the Park and is named after an early settlement homestead where we stayed.
Western Grey Kangaroo
Western Grey Kangaroo
This female was carrying a joey in her pouch.
From the Summit of West Mount Darren
From the Summit of West Mount Darren
The Fitzgerald Nat. Park is overlooked by a few small hills not a common feature in Western Australia's SW. It provides very good view of the park looking towards Bremer Bay and the Southern Ocean.
Trigelow Bay
Trigelow Bay
One of many south coast by where Southern Right Whales, amongst others, come to have their young
Fitzgerald River National Park
Fitzgerald River National Park
This huge area extends as far as the eye can see in the evening light.
Spider Orchdis
Spider Orchdis
Of the thousands of plant species to be found in WA the spider Orchids have become a fascination. I cannot tell one from another but they have a particular structure and relationship with fungi and insects which is quite amazing. They belong to the genus Caladenia.
I have not named most of them .
Carousel Spider orchid. Caledenia sp.
Carousel Spider orchid. Caledenia sp.
White Spider Orchid
White Spider Orchid
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Mantis Orchid possibly
Mantis Orchid possibly
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Caledenia sp.
Donkey Orchis
Donkey Orchis
Cowslip Orchid
Cowslip Orchid
Zebra Orchid
Zebra Orchid
Pink Fairy Orchid
Pink Fairy Orchid
Jug Orchid
Jug Orchid
I think that is the name but could be wrong. I liked the mosquito but they were pretty ferocious in some locations.
Wreath Lesuchenaultia
Wreath Lesuchenaultia
This was a plant I had wanted to see for a number of years.
Ironic I should find in after my wife passed away. Usually circular this one was heart shaped!! RIP

          

I spent a number of weeks in Western Australia which I have visited several times over the last 15 years or so.

Although I have photographed much of the flora and fauna there it is so vast that a permanent residence would be need to see and photograph it all!

The SWcorner of the state is one of the World's Biodiversity Hotspots but relatively few people, even in Australia, are aware of the fantastic wildlife they have! The reasons for this are several but include its geological history with undisturbed millions of years without either glacial or volcanic activity hence leaching of the soils by preciptation rendering them extremely nutrient poor. This has given rise to a highly adapted flora and hence all the fauna that is ecologically related to that base.

In presenting some of the images made during this visit I have named only a few of the subjects photographed. As there are over 10 thousand differnt species of flowering plant alone it would be impossible for a visitor to begin to remember common names,let alone botanical names. For those that wish to so do I suggest the internet is the best way forward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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